Emergency Department – St. Anthonys

If You're Experiencing An Emergency Call 911.

Emergency Medicine | Every Minute Counts

The new HSHS St. Anthony’s Memorial Hospital Emergency Department renovation has improved patient and visitor safety while enhancing patient experience. This includes an expansion of the department, taking its square footage from approximately 8,000 square feet to 13,000 square feet, including 17 private rooms with the same number of beds that previously existed.

To increase the safety and security of all of our patients, the updated Emergency Department also includes private patient triage and confidential registration functions that include the repositioning of the nurses’ station, allowing staff to have a line-of-sight to each patient treatment area. Additionally, the Security office has been relocated to the entrance of the Emergency Department to help provide safety oversight for colleagues, physicians and patients. The new renovation also includes  the addition of new rooms designed to help keep behavioral health patients safe, fully equipped with special furnishings and equipment.

The new HSHS St. Anthony’s Memorial Hospital Emergency Department renovation has improved patient and visitor safety while enhancing patient experience. This includes an expansion of the department, taking its square footage from approximately 8,000 square feet to 13,000 square feet, including 17 private rooms with the same number of beds that previously existed.

To increase the safety and security of all of our patients, the updated Emergency Department also includes private patient triage and confidential registration functions that include the repositioning of the nurses’ station, allowing staff to have a line-of-sight to each patient treatment area. Additionally, the Security office has been relocated to the entrance of the Emergency Department to help provide safety oversight for colleagues, physicians and patients. The new renovation also includes  the addition of new rooms designed to help keep behavioral health patients safe, fully equipped with special furnishings and equipment.

Dial. Don't Drive. Call 911.

EMERGENCY MEDICINE
IS SPECIAL.

Our emergency medicine teams are made up of registered nurses, advanced midlevel providers, board-certified physicians and other specially trained staff who are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to treat anyone seeking emergency medical care.

EMERGENCY MEDICINE
IS SPECIAL.

Our emergency medicine teams are made up of registered nurses, advanced midlevel providers, board-certified physicians and other specially trained staff who are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to treat anyone seeking emergency medical care.

Emergency Medicine | Every Minute Counts

EMERGENT CARE NEEDS VS. CONVENIENT WALK-IN CARE NEEDS.

Emergency Medicine is different from walk-in clinics, such as Convenient Care.  When you are experiencing ACUTE AND CRITICAL health issues you need emergent care.

The most common complaints and diagnoses include chest pain, respiratory distress, occupational injuries, drug overdoses, severe abdominal pain, injuries from motor-vehicle accidents, seizure disorders, deep lacerations, eye injuries, suicidal risks and stroke signs or symptoms.

DIAL. DON'T DRIVE.

BENEFITS OF CALLING 9-1-1

- Treatment starts at time of call to dispatch

- Dispatch will advise initial treatment that can actually start at home

- EMS continues treatment and diagnosis on scene

- Oxygen and medications are given, EKG and blood pressure can be performed

- EMS can also revive and resuscitate a patient

- No delays driving to hospital - Lights and Siren

- Present to hospital for immediate medical attention

RISKS OF DRIVING YOURSELF

- No home assessment prior to driving to hospital

- Passenger cars have to fight the other traffic and obey traffic lights

- 1 in 300 people experiencing a heart attack die on the way to the hospital

- If the patient arrives OK, they will have to sign in, be triaged and then receive their first diagnostic treatment of EKG and blood pressure check

- Oxygen and medications are given once the patient is brought to a room

EMERGENT CARE NEEDS VS. CONVENIENT WALK-IN CARE NEEDS.

Emergency Medicine is different from walk-in clinics, such as Convenient Care.  When you are experiencing ACUTE AND CRITICAL health issues you need emergent care.

The most common complaints and diagnoses include chest pain, respiratory distress, occupational injuries, drug overdoses, severe abdominal pain, injuries from motor-vehicle accidents, seizure disorders, deep lacerations, eye injuries, suicidal risks and stroke signs or symptoms.

DIAL. DON'T DRIVE.

BENEFITS OF CALLING 9-1-1

- Treatment starts at time of call to dispatch

- Dispatch will advise initial treatment that can actually start at home

- EMS continues treatment and diagnosis on scene

- Oxygen and medications are given, EKG and blood pressure can be performed

- EMS can also revive and resuscitate a patient

- No delays driving to hospital - Lights and Siren

- Present to hospital for immediate medical attention

RISKS OF DRIVING YOURSELF

- No home assessment prior to driving to hospital

- Passenger cars have to fight the other traffic and obey traffic lights

- 1 in 300 people experiencing a heart attack die on the way to the hospital

- If the patient arrives OK, they will have to sign in, be triaged and then receive their first diagnostic treatment of EKG and blood pressure check

- Oxygen and medications are given once the patient is brought to a room

Dial. Don't Drive. Call 911.

When it comes to a heart attack or stroke, the quicker the response the better.

WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A STROKE AND
A HEART ATTACK?

Heart attack occurs when blood flow to the heart is blocked and heart muscle cells begin to die. Restoring blood flow quickly stops the damage and preserves heart function.

Stroke occurs when blood flow is blocked to the brain. According to the National Stroke Association, two million brain cells die every minute during a stroke, making fast treatment essential to survival and recovery.