Emergency Department – St. Anthonys

If You're Experiencing An Emergency Call 911.

Emergency Medicine | Every Minute Counts

The new HSHS St. Anthony’s Memorial Hospital Emergency Department renovation has improved patient and visitor safety while enhancing patient experience. This includes an expansion of the department, taking its square footage from approximately 8,000 square feet to 13,000 square feet, including 17 private rooms with the same number of beds that previously existed.

The new HSHS St. Anthony’s Memorial Hospital Emergency Department renovation has improved patient and visitor safety while enhancing patient experience. This includes an expansion of the department, taking its square footage from approximately 8,000 square feet to 13,000 square feet, including 17 private rooms with the same number of beds that previously existed.

To increase the safety and security of all of our patients, the updated Emergency Department also includes private patient triage and confidential registration functions that include the repositioning of the nurses’ station, allowing staff to have a line-of-sight to each patient treatment area. Additionally, the Security office has been relocated to the entrance of the Emergency Department to help provide safety oversight for colleagues, physicians and patients. The new renovation also includes  the addition of new rooms designed to help keep behavioral health patients safe, fully equipped with special furnishings and equipment.

Dial. Don't Drive. Call 911.

EMERGENCY MEDICINE
IS SPECIAL.

Our emergency medicine teams are made up of registered nurses, advanced midlevel providers, board-certified physicians and other specially trained staff who are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to treat anyone seeking emergency medical care.

EMERGENCY MEDICINE
IS SPECIAL.

Our emergency medicine teams are made up of registered nurses, advanced midlevel providers, board-certified physicians and other specially trained staff who are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to treat anyone seeking emergency medical care.

Emergency Medicine | Every Minute Counts

EMERGENT CARE NEEDS VS. CONVENIENT WALK-IN CARE NEEDS.

Emergency Medicine is different from walk-in clinics, such as Convenient Care.  When you are experiencing ACUTE AND CRITICAL health issues, you need emergent care.

The most common complaints and diagnoses include chest pain, respiratory distress, occupational injuries, drug overdoses, severe abdominal pain, injuries from motor-vehicle accidents, seizure disorders, deep lacerations, eye injuries, suicidal risks and stroke signs or symptoms.

DIAL. DON'T DRIVE.

BENEFITS OF CALLING 9-1-1

- Treatment starts at time of call to dispatch

- Dispatch will advise initial treatment that can actually start at home

- EMS continues treatment and diagnosis on scene

- Oxygen and medications are given, EKG and blood pressure can be performed

- EMS can also revive and resuscitate a patient

- No delays driving to hospital - Lights and Siren

- Present to hospital for immediate medical attention

RISKS OF DRIVING YOURSELF

- No home assessment prior to driving to hospital

- Passenger cars have to fight the other traffic and obey traffic lights

- 1 in 300 people experiencing a heart attack die on the way to the hospital

- If the patient arrives OK, they will have to sign in, be triaged and then receive their first diagnostic treatment of EKG and blood pressure check

- Oxygen and medications are given once the patient is brought to a room

EMERGENT CARE NEEDS VS. CONVENIENT WALK-IN CARE NEEDS.

Emergency Medicine is different from walk-in clinics, such as Convenient Care.  When you are experiencing ACUTE AND CRITICAL health issues, you need emergent care.

The most common complaints and diagnoses include chest pain, respiratory distress, occupational injuries, drug overdoses, severe abdominal pain, injuries from motor-vehicle accidents, seizure disorders, deep lacerations, eye injuries, suicidal risks and stroke signs or symptoms.

DIAL. DON'T DRIVE.

BENEFITS OF CALLING 9-1-1

- Treatment starts at time of call to dispatch

- Dispatch will advise initial treatment that can actually start at home

- EMS continues treatment and diagnosis on scene

- Oxygen and medications are given, EKG and blood pressure can be performed

- EMS can also revive and resuscitate a patient

- No delays driving to hospital - Lights and Siren

- Present to hospital for immediate medical attention

RISKS OF DRIVING YOURSELF

- No home assessment prior to driving to hospital

- Passenger cars have to fight the other traffic and obey traffic lights

- 1 in 300 people experiencing a heart attack die on the way to the hospital

- If the patient arrives OK, they will have to sign in, be triaged and then receive their first diagnostic treatment of EKG and blood pressure check

- Oxygen and medications are given once the patient is brought to a room

Dial. Don't Drive. Call 911.

When it comes to a heart attack or stroke, the quicker the response the better.

WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A STROKE AND
A HEART ATTACK?

Heart attack occurs when blood flow to the heart is blocked and heart muscle cells begin to die. Restoring blood flow quickly stops the damage and preserves heart function.

Stroke occurs when blood flow is blocked to the brain. According to the National Stroke Association, two million brain cells die every minute during a stroke, making fast treatment essential to survival and recovery.

HSHS St. Anthony's is part of the Stat Heart Program, coordinated by Prairie Cardiovascular, which streamlines emergency care to meet the national goal of providing angioplasty (a non-surgical procedure to treat diseased arteries) within 90 minutes from a patient's arrival at their community hospital. By utilizing best practices, St. Anthony's Emergency Department's exceptional staff are able to identify, treat, and transfer heart attack patients quickly to St. John's Hospital, with patients often being transferred in less than the 30-minute goal after arriving in our ER. This allows patients to receive emergent heart intervention by a Prairie Heart Cardiologist as quickly as possible, saving heart muscle and increasing a patient's chance for full recovery.

Know the signs and call 911 if you are experiencing these symptoms.

The physicians and nurses who work in our Emergency Department are vital members of heart and stroke care teams and are on high alert 24/7 to accurately diagnose and provide you the medical treatment you need.

When it comes to a heart attack or stroke, the quicker the response the better.

WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A STROKE AND
A HEART ATTACK?

Heart attack occurs when blood flow to the heart is blocked and heart muscle cells begin to die. Restoring blood flow quickly stops the damage and preserves heart function.

Stroke occurs when blood flow is blocked to the brain. According to the National Stroke Association, two million brain cells die every minute during a stroke, making fast treatment essential to survival and recovery.

HSHS St. Anthony's is part of the Stat Heart Program, coordinated by Prairie Cardiovascular, which streamlines emergency care to meet the national goal of providing angioplasty (a non-surgical procedure to treat diseased arteries) within 90 minutes from a patient's arrival at their community hospital. By utilizing best practices, St. Anthony's Emergency Department's exceptional staff are able to identify, treat, and transfer heart attack patients quickly to St. John's Hospital, with patients often being transferred in less than the 30-minute goal after arriving in our ER. This allows patients to receive emergent heart intervention by a Prairie Heart Cardiologist as quickly as possible, saving heart muscle and increasing a patient's chance for full recovery.

Know the signs and call 911 if you are experiencing these symptoms.

The physicians and nurses who work in our Emergency Department are vital members of heart and stroke care teams and are on high alert 24/7 to accurately diagnose and provide you the medical treatment you need.

WARNING SIGNS OF A HEART ATTACK IN WOMEN:

- Pressure, fullness, squeezing pain in the center of the chest, spreading to the neck, shoulder or jaw

- Chest discomfort with light-headedness, fainting, sweating, nausea, or shortness of breath

- Upper abdominal pressure or discomfort

- Unusual shortness of breath

- Lower chest discomfort

- Back pain

- Unusual fatigue

- Dizziness

- Nausea

WARNING SIGNS OF A HEART ATTACK IN MEN:

- Chest pain or discomfort that can feel like uncomfortable pressure, fullness, squeezing or pain in the chest. It may last for more than a few minutes, or it can come and go.

- Discomfort or pain in other areas, such as one or both arms, the neck, jaw, back or stomach

- Shortness of breath, light-headedness, nausea, or sweating

- Abdominal discomfort that may feel like indigestion

Identifying signs and symptoms of a stroke, remember the acronym FAST.

Face Drooping: Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop?

Arm Weakness: Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?

Speech Difficulty: Is speech slurred, are they unable to speak, or are they hard to understand? Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence, like "The sky is blue." Is the sentence repeated correctly?

Time to call 911: If you observe any of these signs, call 9-1-1 immediately.

*Additional stroke signs include: sudden severe headache with no known cause, sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination; sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes; or sudden confusion or trouble understanding.

Emergency Medicine | Every Minute Counts

There are three types of burns that you may experience:

First-degree burns damage the top layer of skin causing redness, swelling and pain

Second-degree burns damage the outer skin and the dermis, the underlying skin layer

Third-degree burns destroy both layers of skin and damage the tissue below. These serious burns require immediate emergency medical care

Call 911 or head to the emergency room if the burn is larger than three inches across, if the skin is broken or scorched or is located on the face, hands, feet, genitals or a major joint such as knee or shoulder.

There are three types of burns that you may experience:

First-degree burns damage the top layer of skin causing redness, swelling and pain

Second-degree burns damage the outer skin and the dermis, the underlying skin layer

Third-degree burns destroy both layers of skin and damage the tissue below. These serious burns require immediate emergency medical care

Call 911 or head to the emergency room if the burn is larger than three inches across, if the skin is broken or scorched or is located on the face, hands, feet, genitals or a major joint such as knee or shoulder.

Dial. Don't Drive. Call 911.

Accidents can cause broken bones and broken lives. Our emergency medicine specialists are prepared and ready to treat unexpected traumas.

In a major trauma – minutes count. If a trauma requires additional medical expertise, we have a helicopter standing by to fly you to the closest Level 1 Trauma Center in minutes.

One out of every 4 car accidents in the United States is caused by texting and driving according to the National Safety Council. Answering a text takes away your attention for about five seconds. Traveling at 55 mph, that's enough time to travel the length of a football field.

Reduce your risk of ending up in an emergency room – don't text and drive.

Accidents can cause broken bones and broken lives. Our emergency medicine specialists are prepared and ready to treat unexpected traumas.

In a major trauma – minutes count. If a trauma requires additional medical expertise, we have a helicopter standing by to fly you to the closest Level 1 Trauma Center in minutes.

One out of every 4 car accidents in the United States is caused by texting and driving according to the National Safety Council. Answering a text takes away your attention for about five seconds. Traveling at 55 mph, that's enough time to travel the length of a football field.

Reduce your risk of ending up in an emergency room – don't text and drive.

Emergency Medicine | Every Minute Counts

When your child is sick or injured, you want the best care in the fastest way possible. In some situations, you should dial 911 to get an ambulance instead of taking your child to the ER yourself.

Call 911 if:

- Your child is having trouble breathing and is turning blue

- Your child loses consciousness or is not responsive

- Your child is having a seizure

- Your child might have a neck or spine injury

- Your child has a head injury with a loss of consciousness, lasting vomiting, or is not responding normally

- Your child has significant uncontrolled bleeding

- Your child has a possible poisoning and is not responding normally or is having trouble breathing

When you go to the ER, it's important to know the details of your child's current problem including:

- When the problem began (the time of injury or how many days your child has been sick)

- The symptoms of the current illness or injury

- Treatments and medicines you have already tried

- When your child last had anything to eat or drink

If you go to the ER because your child has ingested a particular medicine or household product, bring the container of whatever was ingested. That will help the doctors understand what kind of treatment is needed. If your child swallowed an object, bring an example of that object, if possible.

It's also important to know your child's medical history like allergies, past illnesses, injuries, surgeries, immunization history, or chronic conditions. Consider writing it down so it's handy during the chaos of an emergency. And keeping a written record readily available at home will let anyone caring for your child — such as a babysitter or grandparent — be able to provide this important information should your child be taken to the ER under their care.

You should know the name and number of your child's primary care provider. And it's good to know the name and number of the pharmacy where you usually get your prescriptions filled.

When your child is sick or injured, you want the best care in the fastest way possible. In some situations, you should dial 911 to get an ambulance instead of taking your child to the ER yourself.

Call 911 if:

- Your child is having trouble breathing and is turning blue

- Your child loses consciousness or is not responsive

- Your child is having a seizure

- Your child might have a neck or spine injury

- Your child has a head injury with a loss of consciousness, lasting vomiting, or is not responding normally

- Your child has significant uncontrolled bleeding

- Your child has a possible poisoning and is not responding normally or is having trouble breathing

When you go to the ER, it's important to know the details of your child's current problem including:

- When the problem began (the time of injury or how many days your child has been sick)

- The symptoms of the current illness or injury

- Treatments and medicines you have already tried

- When your child last had anything to eat or drink

If you go to the ER because your child has ingested a particular medicine or household product, bring the container of whatever was ingested. That will help the doctors understand what kind of treatment is needed. If your child swallowed an object, bring an example of that object, if possible.

It's also important to know your child's medical history like allergies, past illnesses, injuries, surgeries, immunization history, or chronic conditions. Consider writing it down so it's handy during the chaos of an emergency. And keeping a written record readily available at home will let anyone caring for your child — such as a babysitter or grandparent — be able to provide this important information should your child be taken to the ER under their care.

You should know the name and number of your child's primary care provider. And it's good to know the name and number of the pharmacy where you usually get your prescriptions filled.

Dial. Don't Drive. Call 911.

In our pursuit to continue to enhance the care you receive, please fill out the form below to learn more about upcoming hospital renovations and enhancement projects.

Emergency Medicine | Every Minute Counts

We look forward to talking with you.