Surgery – St. Anthonys

Advanced Orthopedic Surgeries

Getting You Back Faster.

Advanced Orthopedic Surgeries

Getting You Back Faster.

KNEE SURGERIES

KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

Knee Replacement surgery can aid in joint pain and renew function in injured joints. The procedure entails removing the affected bone and cartilage of the joint from surrounding areas of the thigh, shin, and kneecap. The surgeon would then put in the replacement artificial joint. You might want to consider yourself a candidate for Knee Replacement surgery if you have trouble walking, climbing up and down stairs, as well as getting in and out of chairs. Other patients also experience knee pain without using the joint inactivity, but simply at rest. Potential surgery complications include infection, blood clots, heart attack, stroke, and nerve damage. A patient should be aware of signs of infection through these symptoms: fever greater than 100F (37.8 C); shaking chills; drainage from surgical site; increasing redness, tenderness swelling, and pain in the knee. If infection occurs, then another surgery will take place to remove the prosthesis, the patient will be given antibiotics to fight infection, and then an additional surgery will occur to install a new prosthesis once the infection is gone. Prosthesis receives a large amount of wear and tear. An additional knee replacement surgery could occur if the artificial joint fails over time.

PARTIAL KNEE REPLACEMENT

Knee Osteotomy is recommended to patients who suffer from arthritis damage in a particular area of their knee. Osteotomy can also take place in other forms of knee surgery including cartilage surgery. Over time, cartilage rubbing against each other creates a rough, uneven surface. The area becomes narrow and results in the knee bowing inward or outward. The surgery requires removal or addition of a wedge of bone usually to your tibia (shin) or femur (thigh) to transfer body weight from the affected region, allowing your joint relief from pressure. The absence or addition of the wedge helps straighten the bowing and increases the longevity of the joint. You might want to consider yourself a candidate for Knee Osteotomy if you are younger than 60 and active with arthritis pain. Potential surgery complications include infection in the bone or in the surrounding soft tissues, failure of the pieces of bone to knit together, injuries to nerves or blood vessels around the knee, and incomplete pain relief.

KNEE PAIN/KNEE BRACES

Knee pain may have stemmed from injury, like ruptured ligaments or torn cartilage, or certain medical conditions, such as arthritis, gout, and infection. Many knee pain issues can be resolved through physical therapy sessions and knee braces, but there are certain issues that result in surgery. You may want to speak to your doctor about possible relief for knee pain if you find your knee swelling or stiff, inflamed or warm to touch, weak or unstable, popping or crunching when bent, or if you find yourself unable to fully straighten the knee. Definitely contact your doctor if you cannot bear weight on your knee or if the knee feels unstable, have marked knee swelling, are unable to fully extend or flex your knee, see obvious deformity in leg or knee, have a fever with redness, swelling, and pain in your knee, or if you have severe knee pain from a new or previous injury (ACL injury, fracture, torn meniscus, knee bursitis, or patellar tendinitis.) An anterior cruciate ligament tear (ACL injury) is common among people who play sports that are very active and involve a lot of back and forth movement. Fractures in the kneecap are especially common in motor vehicle collisions or falls. Kneecaps can also be fractured easily through weakened bones from osteoporosis. The meniscus can be torn when the knee abruptly twists while bearing any weight. Knee bursitis occurs when the sacs of fluid around the knee, the bursae, become inflamed. Patellar tendonitis is when the patellar tendon, or the tissue that connects the quadriceps to the front of the thigh to the shinbone, becomes irritated or inflamed. Athletes in many jumping sports like running, skiing, or cycling often suffer from this.

MINIMALLY INVASIVE ROBOTIC KNEE REPLACEMENT.

The MAKO robotic-arm assisted surgery provides your surgeon with the ability to have greater accuracy during your procedure, ensuring safety and lessening recovery time when operating on the hip and knee. Because of this innovative technique, patients experience longer-lasting replacement joints and less invasive surgery.

KNEE SURGERIES

KNEE ARTHROPLASTY

Knee Replacement surgery can aid in joint pain and renew function in injured joints. The procedure entails removing the affected bone and cartilage of the joint from surrounding areas of the thigh, shin, and kneecap. The surgeon would then put in the replacement artificial joint. You might want to consider yourself a candidate for Knee Replacement surgery if you have trouble walking, climbing up and down stairs, as well as getting in and out of chairs. Other patients also experience knee pain without using the joint inactivity, but simply at rest. Potential surgery complications include infection, blood clots, heart attack, stroke, and nerve damage. A patient should be aware of signs of infection through these symptoms: fever greater than 100F (37.8 C); shaking chills; drainage from surgical site; increasing redness, tenderness swelling, and pain in the knee. If infection occurs, then another surgery will take place to remove the prosthesis, the patient will be given antibiotics to fight infection, and then an additional surgery will occur to install a new prosthesis once the infection is gone. Prosthesis receives a large amount of wear and tear. An additional knee replacement surgery could occur if the artificial joint fails over time.

PARTIAL KNEE REPLACEMENT

Knee Osteotomy is recommended to patients who suffer from arthritis damage in a particular area of their knee. Osteotomy can also take place in other forms of knee surgery including cartilage surgery. Over time, cartilage rubbing against each other creates a rough, uneven surface. The area becomes narrow and results in the knee bowing inward or outward. The surgery requires removal or addition of a wedge of bone usually to your tibia (shin) or femur (thigh) to transfer body weight from the affected region, allowing your joint relief from pressure. The absence or addition of the wedge helps straighten the bowing and increases the longevity of the joint. You might want to consider yourself a candidate for Knee Osteotomy if you are younger than 60 and active with arthritis pain. Potential surgery complications include infection in the bone or in the surrounding soft tissues, failure of the pieces of bone to knit together, injuries to nerves or blood vessels around the knee, and incomplete pain relief.

KNEE PAIN/KNEE BRACES

Knee pain may have stemmed from injury, like ruptured ligaments or torn cartilage, or certain medical conditions, such as arthritis, gout, and infection. Many knee pain issues can be resolved through physical therapy sessions and knee braces, but there are certain issues that result in surgery. You may want to speak to your doctor about possible relief for knee pain if you find your knee swelling or stiff, inflamed or warm to touch, weak or unstable, popping or crunching when bent, or if you find yourself unable to fully straighten the knee. Definitely contact your doctor if you cannot bear weight on your knee or if the knee feels unstable, have marked knee swelling, are unable to fully extend or flex your knee, see obvious deformity in leg or knee, have a fever with redness, swelling, and pain in your knee, or if you have severe knee pain from a new or previous injury (ACL injury, fracture, torn meniscus, knee bursitis, or patellar tendinitis.) An anterior cruciate ligament tear (ACL injury) is common among people who play sports that are very active and involve a lot of back and forth movement. Fractures in the kneecap are especially common in motor vehicle collisions or falls. Kneecaps can also be fractured easily through weakened bones from osteoporosis. The meniscus can be torn when the knee abruptly twists while bearing any weight. Knee bursitis occurs when the sacs of fluid around the knee, the bursae, become inflamed. Patellar tendonitis is when the patellar tendon, or the tissue that connects the quadriceps to the front of the thigh to the shinbone, becomes irritated or inflamed. Athletes in many jumping sports like running, skiing, or cycling often suffer from this.

MINIMALLY INVASIVE ROBOTIC KNEE REPLACEMENT.

The MAKO robotic-arm assisted surgery provides your surgeon with the ability to have greater accuracy during your procedure, ensuring safety and lessening recovery time when operating on the hip and knee. Because of this innovative technique, patients experience longer-lasting replacement joints and less invasive surgery.

HIP SURGERIES

TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY

Hip Replacement surgery includes removing the affected sections of the hip joint to put in a prosthetic. You may want to consider yourself a candidate for hip replacement surgery if you suffer from Osteoarthritis (wear and tear arthritis), Rheumatoid arthritis (inflammation that can break away cartilage or bone), or Osteonecrosis (insufficient blood supply to the hip joint’s ball portion). If your hip pain persists, despite pain medication; worsens with walking, even with a cane or walker; interferes with your sleep; affects your ability to go up or down stairs; or makes it difficult to rise from a seated position, then you too may want to consider asking your doctor about hip replacement surgery. Potential surgery complications may include blood clots, infection, fracture, dislocation, change in leg length, or loosening. Prosthetic hip joints eventually age over time and could result in additional hip replacement surgery.

HIP IMPINGEMENT

When the ball and socket of the hip do not fit together comfortably, hip impingement is occurring. The incorrect movement of the ball and socket wears the cartilage and can result in pain and arthritis for young adults. Hip impingement also occurs when the ball is deformed and sits in the socket incorrectly or the socket is too far extended that it covers the ball. A combination of the two can also lead to hip impingement. You may want to speak with your doctor if you experience pain in the groin area from flexing the hip during running, jumping, or sitting for long periods of time. Surgery can be considered when trying to prevent the hip from being additionally injured.

HIP LABRAL TEAR

The hip labral tear comes from the ring of cartilage, known as the labrum, which functions as a cushion to the hip and a seal for the ball fastened at the top of the thighbone within the hip socket. Hockey, soccer, football, golf, and ballet are popular sports for this type of injury. Although hip labral tears frequently do not show any form of warning signs, there are a few to alert you of a potential problem. If you experience any locking, clicking, or catching sensation in your hip joint; pain in your hip or groin; or stiffness or limited range of motion in your hip joint, you may consider checking in with your doctor. Definitely, check in with your doctor if these warning signs become worse or do not change in a six-week period. This type of tear can originate from injury or dislocation to the hip joint (trauma), structural abnormalities, or sports-related and other physical activity repetitive motions. In the future, this type of tear could advance into osteoarthritis in that joint.

HIP SURGERIES

TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY

Hip Replacement surgery includes removing the affected sections of the hip joint to put in a prosthetic. You may want to consider yourself a candidate for hip replacement surgery if you suffer from Osteoarthritis (wear and tear arthritis), Rheumatoid arthritis (inflammation that can break away cartilage or bone), or Osteonecrosis (insufficient blood supply to the hip joint’s ball portion). If your hip pain persists, despite pain medication; worsens with walking, even with a cane or walker; interferes with your sleep; affects your ability to go up or down stairs; or makes it difficult to rise from a seated position, then you too may want to consider asking your doctor about hip replacement surgery. Potential surgery complications may include blood clots, infection, fracture, dislocation, change in leg length, or loosening. Prosthetic hip joints eventually age over time and could result in additional hip replacement surgery.

HIP IMPINGEMENT

When the ball and socket of the hip do not fit together comfortably, hip impingement is occurring. The incorrect movement of the ball and socket wears the cartilage and can result in pain and arthritis for young adults. Hip impingement also occurs when the ball is deformed and sits in the socket incorrectly or the socket is too far extended that it covers the ball. A combination of the two can also lead to hip impingement. You may want to speak with your doctor if you experience pain in the groin area from flexing the hip during running, jumping, or sitting for long periods of time. Surgery can be considered when trying to prevent the hip from being additionally injured.

HIP LABRAL TEAR

The hip labral tear comes from the ring of cartilage, known as the labrum, which functions as a cushion to the hip and a seal for the ball fastened at the top of the thighbone within the hip socket. Hockey, soccer, football, golf, and ballet are popular sports for this type of injury. Although hip labral tears frequently do not show any form of warning signs, there are a few to alert you of a potential problem. If you experience any locking, clicking, or catching sensation in your hip joint; pain in your hip or groin; or stiffness or limited range of motion in your hip joint, you may consider checking in with your doctor. Definitely, check in with your doctor if these warning signs become worse or do not change in a six-week period. This type of tear can originate from injury or dislocation to the hip joint (trauma), structural abnormalities, or sports-related and other physical activity repetitive motions. In the future, this type of tear could advance into osteoarthritis in that joint.

We look forward to talking with you.

About Us

Since 1875, the health care needs of the sick and poor have been met by the Sisters, Medical Staff, colleagues, and volunteers of St. Anthony’s Memorial Hospital. The hospital serves the Effingham community and the south-central region of Illinois.

St. Anthony’s approach to health care combines the compassion and human touch of more than a century of caring with the most modern technologies available today.

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Contact Us

HSHS St. Anthony’s Memorial Hospital

217-347-1294

Address

HSHS St. Anthony’s Memorial Hospital
503 North Maple Street
Effingham, Illinois 62401